UFF-FAU

United Faculty of Florida-Florida Atlantic University Chapter

  • Apr
    11

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  • Mar
    3

    Big job ahead at FAU: New president faces several challengesFlorida Atlantic University’s new president, John Kelly, who has officially begun work, will be paid at least $440,000 his first year, in addition to benefits and retirement compensation, bringing the whole package to a minimum $500,000.

    The FAU Board of Trustees approved Kelly’s five-year contract February 18th, which includes $400,000 base salary and a $40,000 sign-on bonus.

    He is also eligible for a performance bonus of up to $40,000 a year. An additional $60,000 a year will be set aside for retirement compensation.

    Read article at Sun-Sentinel.com

    Download and view PDF of President John Kelly’s Contract

     

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  • Feb
    25

    UFF-FAU is pleased to present a new study commissioned from the Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy at Florida International University. The report, “How FAU Prioritizes Its Money,” locates disturbing trends in Florida Atlantic University’s personnel and salary-related budgeting priorities. Taken as a whole, these suggest a developing inability for the institution to adequately service the academic needs of its growing student body.

    For example, between 2006 and 2012 Florida resident-students choosing to attend FAU are paying more than 60% more in tuition. At the same time the student-to-faculty ratio rose by an astounding 19% while administrative positions grew by 12%. In the same period faculty salaries have also decreased, making it more difficult to attract and retain capable instructional and research staff.

    Read the rest of this entry »

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  • Jan
    9

    January 9, 2014

    By Chris Robé

    Happy New Year! As you emerge from your eggnog stupor and candy yam bloat, your friendly faculty union prepares the way for a better 2014.

    Read the rest of this entry »

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  • Oct
    28

    Dear Faculty,

    The union has received a series of questions regarding summer rates, so I wanted to clarify the matter here.

    The second summer course has been a point of contention for administration for the past few years. They and many of the deans claimed that a 12.5% rate made a second summer course for in-unit faculty either increasingly difficult to sustain or never sustainable in the first place, depending upon which college you are located within.

    UFF started bargaining a lower price for a second summer course with the caveat that our bargaining contract language guarantees bargaining unit faculty receive the first offer for a second summer course, something absent from prior contract language. The new language states: “If all bargaining unit employees qualified to teach a class have already been offered two classes to teach or an equivalent assignment, the University may offer the supplemental summer appointment to anyone who is qualified (e.g., adjuncts).” If you read the old contract, it only states “one” class.

    We initially suggested the second summer course occur at a 10% rate or that we place a cap on the amount faculty could earn for two summer courses. The administration instead suggested that bargaining unit faculty be offered a higher percentage of the adjunct rates for a second course. After much negotiation, faculty rates were determined roughly at 175% of the adjunct rate, give or take depending upon the college.

    These rates, however, are only minimums. As it states in the contract: “Second assigned course: At the minimum rate set in Appendix H, but not to exceed the rate paid for the first course. 12.5%.” Any dean can up these rates for their college as long as they don’t exceed 12.5% for a second summer course.

    UFF understands that faculty in some colleges were teaching two courses for 12.5% each for the last two years.  The dean’s in those colleges can continue to offer the same rates under the new contract if deemed feasible.  Faculty should continue to advocate for higher pay within their colleges, and UFF will continue to try to improve the rates for second summer courses in the future for all faculty. This portion of the collective bargaining agreement will be automatically reopened for Summer 2015.

    The thinking in accepting the deal was: we can either hold out on a 12.5% second course rate that was benefiting an ever-decreasing number of faculty or we could accept a lower rate for a second summer course that was guaranteed to be offered to all bargaining unit faculty first and at a minimum rate that would not immediately simply replicate adjunct pay.

    Hence Appendix H and the changes in language for Article 8.

    Best,

    Chris

    UFF-FAU President

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  • Oct
    23

    CBA Changes 2013

    Filed under: Home;

    ARTICLE 23

    SALARIES

    23.1

    (2)      2013 Legislative Salary Increase.

    a)       In accordance with the Florida Legislative guidelines from Ch. 2013-40, Florida Laws, each eligible employee who qualifies for a “competitive pay adjustment” as defined by law shall receive an increase effective October 1, 2013 consistent with the law.

    b)       Eligible employees earning $40,000 a year or less will receive an increase of $1,400 to their annual base salary, adjusted for full or part-time status. Eligible employees earning more than $40,000 a year will receive an increase of $1,000 to their annual base salary, however the increase for employees in this category must result in a base salary of at least $41,400 a year.

    c)       In order to be eligible for this 2013 Legislative Salary Increase, employees must: (1) have been continuously employed at FAU since July 1, 2013; (2) be meeting required performance standards during the one year period immediately preceding the increase; and (3) have not received an overall AMP appraisal ratings of “Needs Improvement” or “Below Standards,” or the equivalent for faculty, during the one year period immediately preceding the increase.

    23.2 Additional University Compensation Increases for Faculty. The FAU Board of Trustees has made a commitment to additional compensation increases for high performing faculty (not FAUS) and librarians. The University shall provide these bargaining unit employees with a total salary increase pool equal to 2.0% of the September 13, 2013 salary base of eligible bargaining unit employees for the 2013-2014 academic year. This pool includes any applicable legislative appropriated lump-sum compensation.  All salary increases shall be distributed in the following categories:

    a)       Merit Increases.

    (i)       All regular bargaining unit employees who were employed as of May 1, 2013, and have continued employment through October 1, 2013 and have Above Satisfactory overall annual evaluations for the 2012-2013 academic year or the 2012 calendar year will be eligible. The University shall provide a pool of funds to each college for increases to each college/unit equal to approximately 2.0% of the total base salary rate of eligible bargaining unit employees on September 13, 2013. The Dean/Unit head shall distribute these funds in a proportionate, fair and equitable manner to the department/unit.

    (ii)      Merit increases shall be provided to eligible employees consistent                           with criteria specified in Article 10.4.

    (iii)      The increases shall be effective upon ratification by the UFF.

    b)       Market Equity Increases.

    (i)    All regular bargaining unit employees who have three or more academic years of consecutive assignment at FAU as of May 1, 2013 shall be eligible.

    (ii)   The employee’s three year average overall evaluation must be Satisfactory or higher.

    (iii)  For employees whose three year overall evaluations are Above Satisfactory or higher, the employee’s September 13, 2013 salary must be below 100% of the mean salary (parity level) for comparable departments and comparable ranks in the most recent Oklahoma State University Salary survey  (or equivalent).  For employees whose three year overall annual evaluations are Satisfactory, the employee’s September 13, 2013 salary must be below 80% of the mean salary (parity level) for comparable departments and comparable ranks in the most recent Oklahoma State University Salary survey (or equivalent).

    (iv) The University shall provide a pool of funds to each college equal to approximately 2.0% of the total base salary rate of eligible bargaining unit employees on September 13, 2013. This amount is defined as the Available Market Equity for the unit.

    (v)  The Available Market Equity shall be distributed to all eligible employees as defined above based on a formula set by the Dean of each college, and the formula must increase the distribution amount as the disparity from the adjusted parity level (based on evaluation as described above) increases. The formula shall not disqualify employees based on rank. The formula used to distribute funds shall be made available to faculty at least two weeks before the funds are distributed.

    (vi) These increases shall be effective upon ratification by the UFF.

    23.3. Additional Merit Increases for Administrative, Managerial and Professional (“AMP”) Employees.

    a)       The FAU Board of Trustees shall provide AMP bargaining unit employees with a merit salary increase pool equal to 2.0% of the September 13, 2013 salary base of eligible AMP bargaining unit employees.

    b)       All bargaining unit AMP employees who were under appointment as of May 1, 2013 and who have continued appointment through August 7, 2013 shall be eligible.

    c)       Employees on grants or contracts shall receive salary increases equivalent to similar employees on regular funding, provided that such salary increases are permitted by the terms of the contract or grant and adequate funds available for this purpose in the contract or grant.

    d)       These increases shall be distributed according to the merit criteria for the unit.

    e)       These increases shall be effective upon ratification of the BOT/UFF Collective Bargaining Agreement.

    23.4 Florida Atlantic University School Employees.

    a)       FAUS Employee Promotion Increases.

    1) Promotion increases shall be granted to FAUS employees pursuant to procedures and criteria for promotion to each rank for those promoted in 2012-13, effective upon the start of the 2013-14 academic year appointment.  Permanent status employees may be promoted, but may not receive any promotion/merit salary increase.

    2) These increases shall be granted to non-permanent status employees in an amount equal to a specified percentage of the employee’s previous years’ base salary at the time of promotion to one of the ranks described below:

    3%     To achieve University School Accomplished Instructor;

    7%     To University School Assistant Professor;

    8%     To University School Associate Professor; and

    9%     To University School Professor

    b)       FAUS Employee Base Salary Increases.  All FAUS employees shall receive an additional base salary increase for the 2013-2014 school year in accordance with the Statewide Teacher Pay Increases provided by law.  The amount of the base increase for each FAUS employee shall be $2,975 effective at the start of the 2013-14 school year.

    ARTCILE 17

    LEAVES

    17.9    Paid Parental Leave. A 9-month faculty member who does not accrue annual leave and is on a benefit-eligible line of 0.75 FTE or greater may utilize paid parental leave for a period of one regular (Fall or Spring) semester no more than once every three years during his or her employment with the University. FAUS employees and employees on 10- or 12-month appointments are not eligible (retroactively to inception of the benefit). Such paid parental leave will be taken no later than a year from the point when the faculty member becomes a biological parent or a child is placed in the faculty member’s home for purposes of adoption by the faculty member.

    ARTICLE 12

    NON-REAPPOINTMENT

    (8)  FAU Instructors who have been employed at FAU for over three years on an annual appointment will be notified of a subsequent annual appointment offer on or before the expiration of that annual appointment.

    ARTICLE 8
    APPOINTMENT

    (3)  Compensation. An employee who has received a summer appointment to teach a course in accordance with Article 8.4(b) shall be compensated according to the scale below.  The following reflects compensation for a summer course or equivalent assignment that would carry a 0.25 FTE instructional assignment value when teaching the same course, or a course similar in length and content during a semester in the regular academic year, and shall be prorated accordingly.  Percentages are based on the regular 9-month base salary.

    a.     First assigned course:  12.5%.

    b.     Second assigned course: At the minimum rate set in Appendix H, but not to exceed 12.5%.

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  • Sep
    9

    September 9, 2013. Former FAU Pres. and SUS Chancellor Finds New Perch in Pennsylvania Higher Ed

    By Kevin Mahoney
    Raging Chicken Press
    September 6, 2013

    Last month, the Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) lifted the veil of secrecy and announced that they had chosen Frank Brogan to help write the next chapter of the 14 state-owned universities. Brogan comes to PASSHE fresh off his gig as chancellor of Florida’s State University System. PASSHE Board of Governors chair, Guido Pichini, sang the praises of Brogan in a public relations piece released following the announcement:

    He has had an impressive record of success throughout his career. He understands the many complexities and challenges facing public higher education and the vital role public universities play both in preparing students for a lifetime of their own success and in ensuring the economic vitality of the state.

    However, as I reported in my first article on the in-coming chancellor, Pichini’s words could not be judged on their merit. He and PASSHE’s Board of Governors forced search committee members to sign confidentiality agreements to not disclose any information about the search process – including the names of the candidates. Given that PASSHE and public education in general has been under assault by Governor Tom Corbett’s administration, we at Raging Chicken Press thought we should get up to speed on who this guy is.

    Read more at Raging Chicken Press

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  • Aug
    28

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  • Aug
    28

    Summaries of 2013 Admin Survey Written Comments

    President M.J. Saunders: The 268 comments she received were predominantly negative, many of which called for her resignation. The comments reflect the general sentiment of her quantitative poor ranking where 82% of respondents rated her poor or below average. Her mishandling of academic freedom, the Geo Group scandal, and grazing a student with her car were frequently cited criticisms. Even Saunders supposed success—SACS accreditation—came under attack. One faculty member writes: “She repeatedly cites the SACS report as her major achievement, but SACS was only a success if you do not consider the high costs: her focus on credentialing has made the university paranoid about educational innovation lest her credentials police knock on our office doors. The worst bureaucratic regime.” If anything, the comments reveal a completely demoralized faculty that had felt under constant assault for the previous academic year. Many of her previous supporters have expressed disillusionment with her performance. One representative comment notes: “I had high hopes for President Saunders when she first arrived at FAU and was one of her staunchest supporters. But it has since become apparent that she is simply not ready for prime time. The debacles over the stadium naming, supporting academic freedom, aggression toward students, and refusing to listen to criticism, all demonstrate a deep character flaw. Her paranoia about the SACS review reached insane levels. Her temper and anger toward faculty and deans is legendary and extremely unprofessional. She has made a mockery of FAU by cutting herself off from the people and realities that exist outside her office and coterie of close sycophants, thus turning the 3rd floor into a bunker or fortress.”

    Provost Brenda Claiborne received 210 mostly negative comments that also mirrored her low quantitative evaluations where 70% of respondents ranked her either below average or poor. Similar to comments on Saunders, many called for her resignation. Many of the criticisms made about Saunders are also repeated here for Claiborne. Unlike comments critiquing Saunders authoritarian personality, however, Claiborne has been mostly critiqued for incompetency and simply following the university president’s ill-advised orders. A fairly representative comment follows: “Provost Claiborne has very poor management skills. She isolates herself and is inaccessible even to the deans of largest colleges, who are her direct subordinates. Her inaccessibility has left others with confrontation as the only available option. She makes inaccurate public statements and gives directions at the very last minute, providing inadequate time to carry out her requests and then changes her mind. Her repeated missteps have created utter demoralization and a widespread lack of confidence in her leadership.”

    Associate Provost of Northern Campuses Eliah Watlington received 16 comments. Many questioned who Watlington is and what she does. Those who have encountered her consider her personable.

    Associate Provost of Broward Campuses Anthony Abbate received around a dozen comments. Many questioned his lack of presence and communication skills. One praised him for keeping the Broward campus open.

    Dean of Graduate Research Barry Rosson received 138 comments. Similar to every comments of the last few years, Rosson has been critiqued for creating a bureaucratic nightmare with endless paperwork. A frustrated faculty member offers a representative Kafkaesque complaint: “The main purpose of the graduate college appears to be to create as much paperwork as possible and a never-ending sequence of changing rules and procedures that only seem to have minor effects.” Rosson particularly came under attack for removing graduate student stipends for non-teaching students. A faculty member writes: “His policy with removing graduate student stipends for non-teaching grad students is dysfunctional at best and suicidal at worst in terms of funding for the sciences.” Also, faculty repeatedly emphasized his need to better communicate with graduate faculty and graduate students. Many insisted that he resign and the office be closed.

    Interim Dean of Arts and Letters Heather Coltman received 180 mixed comments. About half the comments praise her for making the most under difficult conditions. A typical example follows: “Dear Coltman has done a good job in very difficult times. The upper-administration seems to dislike deans who oppose their views so it is unclear how more vocal Dean Coltman could be without being made to resign.” The other half of the comments see Coltman at as inept and at worst as a stooge for the upper-administration. One faculty member writes: “Dean Coltman appears to have no plan for the college, no agenda, and no ability to stand up to the ridiculous mandates that come from the Provost and President. In fact, that seems to be why she is in the position: because the upper administration knows that she’ll do whatever they tell her. She comes across in meetings as unserious and utterly unequipped to advocate for our college.”

    Dean of Undergraduate Studies Ed Pratt received 57 comments, which mostly praised him. In particular, Pratt’s ability positively compared against the general ineptitude of other administrators. A fairy typical comment states: “An administrator who is willing to make the tough decisions based upon sound research, listening to others, and working for the betterment of the university overall. Would make a more effective Provost.” Other respondents questioned the relevancy of undergraduate studies and its ability to focus the university undergraduate program.

    Dean of the College of Science Gary Perry received one comment encouraging him to stay on as dean.

    Dean of Nursing Marlaine Smith received two comments. One praised her. Another told her to appreciate faculty more than through awards.

    Dean Rosalyn Carter of the College for Design and Social Inquiry received 8 negative comments, many of which asked for her resignation. One faculty member writes, “Our Dean has created an atmosphere where faculty in some units do not feel support – either within the college itself or with university academic administration. That is, if we do not feel a policy made in our unit is fair or appropriate, we do not have any ability to question the policy without being made to feel like we are whining without justification or questioning leadership decisions that it is not our place to question.”

    Interim Dean of the College of Business Som Bhattacharya received one negative comment that questioned his ability to administrate effectively.

    University Libraries Dean William Miller received one comment that suggested he investigate personnel issues himself rather than rely on other administrators’ opinions.

    Dean of the College of Education Valerie Bristor received 6 comments. Half suggested that she need to be more present at the Henderson school. The other three suggests favoritism dictates her discretionary spending in the college.

    Principal Tammy Ferguson of the Henderson School received 10 comments. Eight comments praised her leadership. The other two suggested she needs to work on her communication skills.

    Dean Jeffrey Buller of the Honors College received one comment suggesting that we work harder for the university than his private business.

    Interim Dean Mohhamad Ilyas received 17 written comments. Most of them are positive regarding his administrative abilities. One critiques his administrative capabilities and another suggests he needs to promote research more aggressively.

    Link to:

    Mary Jane Saunders, University President

    President MARY JANE SAUNDERS makes sure that administrators make decisions fairly and in the best interests of the University.
    5 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    10 4% 4-Agree
    24 9% 3-Neutral
    43 18% 2-Disagree
    153 62% 1-Strongly Disagree
    11 5% 0-Do Not Know
    President SAUNDERS makes decisions that are in the best interests of the faculty and professional staff.
    4 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    13 5% 4-Agree
    16 7% 3-Neutral
    38 15% 2-Disagree
    172 70% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 1% 0-Do Not Know
    President SAUNDERS upholds academic standards and encourages a scholarly atmosphere.
    13 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    22 9% 4-Agree
    27 11% 3-Neutral
    30 12% 2-Disagree
    148 61% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 1% 0-Do Not Know
    President SAUNDERS is an effective leader who promotes the development of the University.
    7 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    17 7% 4-Agree
    19 8% 3-Neutral
    36 15% 2-Disagree
    165 67% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 0.4% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, President SAUNDERS is:
    5 2% 5-Excellent
    12 5% 4-Above Average
    26 10% 3-Average
    34 14% 2-Below Average
    166 68% 1-Poor
    2 1% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Brenda Claiborne, University Provost

    Provost Brenda CLAIBORNE is a good administrator.
    6 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    18 8% 4-Agree
    34 14% 3-Neutral
    50 21% 2-Disagree
    116 49% 1-Strongly Disagree
    13 5% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost CLAIBORNE uses faculty governance processes to make decisions.
    3 1% 5-Strongly Agree
    23 10% 4-Agree
    27 11% 3-Neutral
    30 13% 2-Disagree
    139 58% 1-Strongly Disagree
    17 7% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost CLAIBORNE keeps faculty informed about decisions.
    6 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    28 12% 4-Agree
    33 14% 3-Neutral
    41 17% 2-Disagree
    117 49% 1-Strongly Disagree
    12 5% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost CLAIBORNE makes sure that Vice-Presidents and Deans make fair decisions.
    3 1% 5-Strongly Agree
    11 5% 4-Agree
    36 15% 3-Neutral
    28 12% 2-Disagree
    109 46% 1-Strongly Disagree
    50 21% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost CLAIBORNE upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    12 5% 5-Strongly Agree
    31 13% 4-Agree
    41 18% 3-Neutral
    29 12% 2-Disagree
    109 46% 1-Strongly Disagree
    13 6% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost CLAIBORNE is an effective leader who promotes the development of the University.
    8 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    14 6% 4-Agree
    38 16% 3-Neutral
    44 19% 2-Disagree
    120 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    15 6% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Provost CLAIBORNE is:
    5 2% 5-Excellent
    14 6% 4-Above Average
    38 16% 3-Average
    42 18% 2-Below Average
    123 52% 1-Poor
    14 6% 0-Do Not Know

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    Heather Coltman, Interim Dean, College of Arts and Letters

    Interim Dean Heather COLTMAN upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    17 28% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 15% 4-Agree
    9 15% 3-Neutral
    6 10% 2-Disagree
    19 32% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean COLTMAN makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    17 28% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 9% 4-Agree
    7 12% 3-Neutral
    8 13% 2-Disagree
    23 38% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean COLTMAN uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    16 27% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 12% 4-Agree
    11 18% 3-Neutral
    8 13% 2-Disagree
    18 30% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean COLTMAN distributes discretionary money fairly.
    11 23% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 4% 4-Agree
    7 15% 3-Neutral
    7 15% 2-Disagree
    20 43% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean COLTMAN is a good administrator.
    15 25% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 15% 4-Agree
    8 13% 3-Neutral
    7 12% 2-Disagree
    21 35% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean COLTMAN is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    16 27% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 15% 4-Agree
    5 8% 3-Neutral
    8 13% 2-Disagree
    21 35% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 2% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Interim Dean COLTMAN is:
    14 24% 5-Excellent
    9 15% 4-Above Average
    6 10% 3-Average
    8 14% 2-Below Average
    21 36% 1-Poor
    1 2% 0-Do Not Know

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    Som Bhattacharya, Interim Dean, College of Business

    Dean SOM BHATTACHARYA upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    1 25% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 25% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 25% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 25% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BHATTACHARYA makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    2 67% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BHATTACHARYA uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    1 33.3% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 33.3% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 33.3% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BHATTACHARYA distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 33.3% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 33.3% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 33.3% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BHATTACHARYA is a good administrator.
    2 37% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 33% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BHATTACHARYA is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    2 37% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 33% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean BHATTACHARYA is:
    2 37% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    0 0% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    1 33% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Rosalyn Carter, Dean, College of Design and Social Inquiry

    Dean CARTER upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 17% 3-Neutral
    2 33% 2-Disagree
    3 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 17% 2-Disagree
    5 83% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    2 33% 2-Disagree
    4 67% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    3 50% 2-Disagree
    3 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    2 33% 2-Disagree
    4 67% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    3 50% 2-Disagree
    3 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean CARTER is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    2 22% 3-Average
    1 11% 2-Below Average
    6 67% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Valerie Bristor, College of Education

    Dean BRISTOR upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    2 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 25% 4-Agree
    5 25% 3-Neutral
    1 5% 2-Disagree
    7 35% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    3 43% 2-Disagree
    4 57% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    3 43% 2-Disagree
    4 57% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 3% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 14% 3-Neutral
    1 14% 2-Disagree
    5 72% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 14% 4-Agree
    2 29% 3-Neutral
    1 14% 2-Disagree
    3 43% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    7 100% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean BRISTOR is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    0 0% 3-Average
    2 28% 2-Below Average
    5 72% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Mohammad Ilyas, Interim Dean, College of Engineering and Computer Science

    Interim Dean MOHAMMAD ILYAS upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    14 50% 5-Strongly Agree
    8 28% 4-Agree
    1 4% 3-Neutral
    3 11% 2-Disagree
    2 7% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean ILYAS makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    11 39% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 32% 4-Agree
    3 11% 3-Neutral
    1 4% 2-Disagree
    4 14% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean ILYAS uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    11 39% 5-Strongly Agree
    8 28% 4-Agree
    3 11% 3-Neutral
    3 11% 2-Disagree
    3 11% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean ILYAS distributes discretionary money fairly.
    9 32% 5-Strongly Agree
    8 28% 4-Agree
    3 11% 3-Neutral
    4 14% 2-Disagree
    1 4% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 11% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean ILYAS is a good administrator.
    9 32% 5-Strongly Agree
    11 39% 4-Agree
    1 4% 3-Neutral
    3 11% 2-Disagree
    4 14% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean ILYAS is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    11 39% 5-Strongly Agree
    6 21% 4-Agree
    5 18% 3-Neutral
    1 4% 2-Disagree
    5 18% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Interim Dean ILYAS is:
    11 39% 5-Excellent
    8 29% 4-Above Average
    3 11% 3-Average
    2 7% 2-Below Average
    4 14% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Jeffrey Buller, Dean, Honors College

    Dean BULLER upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    2 100% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    1 50% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 50% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    1 50% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 50% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 50% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 50% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 50% 4-Agree
    1 50% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    2 100% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean BULLER is:
    2 25% 5-Excellent
    2 25% 4-Above Average
    2 25% 3-Average
    1 12.5% 2-Below Average
    1 12.5% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    William Miller, Dean, University Libraries

    Dean WILLIAM MILLER upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 50% 2-Disagree
    1 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean MILLER makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    2 100% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean MILLER uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 50% 2-Disagree
    1 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean MILLER distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 50% 2-Disagree
    1 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean MILLER is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    2 100% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean MILLER is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    2 100% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean MILLER is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    1 33% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    2 67% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    David J. Bjorkman, Dean, College of Medicine

    No Results

    Marlaine Smith, Dean, College of Nursing

    Dean MARLAINE SMITH upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    0 63% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 100%span> 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean SMITH makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 100% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean SMITH uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 100% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean SMITH distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 100% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean SMITH is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 100% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean SMITH is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 100% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean SMITH is:
    1 17% 5-Excellent
    4 66% 4-Above Average
    1 17% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Gary Perry, Dean, College of Science

    Dean GARY PERRY upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    7 88% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 12% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PERRY makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 100% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PERRY uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 100% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PERRY distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 100% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PERRY is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 100% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PERRY is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    1 100% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean PERRY is:
    1 100% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    0 0% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Anthony Abbate, Associate Provost of the Broward Campuses (Answers provided by faculty from the Broward Campuses.)

    Associate Provost of Broward Campuses ANTHONY ABBATE is a good administrator.
    4 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 7% 4-Agree
    16 29% 3-Neutral
    3 5% 2-Disagree
    2 4% 1-Strongly Disagree
    27 48% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost ABBATE uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    3 5% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 5% 4-Agree
    15 27% 3-Neutral
    4 7% 2-Disagree
    4 7% 1-Strongly Disagree
    26 47% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost ABBATE keeps faculty informed about decisions.
    4 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 8% 4-Agree
    11 22% 3-Neutral
    5 10% 2-Disagree
    7 14% 1-Strongly Disagree
    20 39% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost ABBATE ensures that campus fiscal resources are appropriately allotted and expended.
    3 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 6% /td> 4-Agree
    12 24% 3-Neutral
    4 8% 2-Disagree
    6 12% 1-Strongly Disagree
    23 45% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost ABBATE is competent in overseeing daily campus operations.
    4 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 4% 4-Agree
    11 22% 3-Neutral
    5 10% 2-Disagree
    2 4% 1-Strongly Disagree
    26 52% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost ABBATE is an effective leader who promotes the development of the campus
    5 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 4% 4-Agree
    11 22% 3-Neutral
    6 12% 2-Disagree
    6 12% 1-Strongly Disagree
    19 39% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Associate Provost ABBATE is:
    4 8% 5-Excellent
    1 2% 4-Above Average
    14 28% 3-Average
    2 4% 2-Below Average
    6 12% 1-Poor
    23 46% 0-Do Not Know

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    Eliah Watlington, Associate Provost of the Northern Campuses (Answers provided by faculty from the Northern Campuses.)

    Associate Provost of Northern Campuses ELIAH WATLINGTON is a good administrator.
    6 18% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 15% 4-Agree
    1 3% 3-Neutral
    3 9% 2-Disagree
    3 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    15 45% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost WATLINGTON uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    4 13% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 16% 4-Agree
    1 3% 3-Neutral
    2 6% 2-Disagree
    4 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    15 48% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost WATLINGTON keeps faculty informed about decisions.
    3 9% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 16% 4-Agree
    4 13% 3-Neutral
    3 9% 2-Disagree
    3 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    14 44% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost WATLINGTON ensures that campus fiscal resources are appropriately allotted and expended.
    5 16% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 6% 4-Agree
    2 6% 3-Neutral
    2 6% 2-Disagree
    2 6% 1-Strongly Disagree
    18 58% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost WATLINGTON is competent in overseeing daily campus operations.
    4 13% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 13% 4-Agree
    3 9% 3-Neutral
    2 6% 2-Disagree
    3 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    16 50% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost WATLINGTON is an effective leader who promotes the development of the campus
    4 13% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 13% 4-Agree
    2 6% 3-Neutral
    2 6% 2-Disagree
    4 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    16 50% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Associate Provost WATLINGTON is:
    5 16% 5-Excellent
    3 9% 4-Above Average
    2 6% 3-Average
    4 13% 2-Below Average
    3 9% 1-Poor
    15 47% 0-Do Not Know

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    Barry Rosson, Graduate College

    Graduate College Dean BARRY ROSSON consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    4 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    14 7% 4-Agree
    29 14% 3-Neutral
    38 19% 2-Disagree
    79 39% 1-Strongly Disagree
    38 19% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean ROSSON upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    7 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    27 13% 4-Agree
    41 20% 3-Neutral
    34 17% 2-Disagree
    57 28% 1-Strongly Disagree
    36 18% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean ROSSON uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    5 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    13 6% 4-Agree
    28 14% 3-Neutral
    34 17% 2-Disagree
    79 39% 1-Strongly Disagree
    42 21% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean ROSSON is a good administrator.
    4 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    14 7% 4-Agree
    39 19% 3-Neutral
    35 17% 2-Disagree
    71 35% 1-Strongly Disagree
    38 19% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean ROSSON effectively leads University Graduate education programs and faculty.
    6 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    14 7% 4-Agree
    44 22% 3-Neutral
    30 15% 2-Disagree
    73 36% 1-Strongly Disagree
    35 17% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean ROSSON competently administers Graduate College operations.
    5 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    16 8% 4-Agree
    39 20% 3-Neutral
    34 17% 2-Disagree
    70 36% 1-Strongly Disagree
    33 17% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean ROSSON is:
    5 3% 5-Excellent
    12 6% 4-Above Average
    41 21% 3-Average
    25 13% 2-Below Average
    81 41% 1-Poor
    35 18% 0-Do Not Know

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    Edward Pratt, Dean, Undergraduate Studies

    Undergraduate Studies Dean EDWARD PRATT consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    26 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    47 25% 4-Agree
    37 20% 3-Neutral
    20 11% 2-Disagree
    19 10% 1-Strongly Disagree
    40 21% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PRATT upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    31 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    57 31% 4-Agree
    35 19% 3-Neutral
    11 6% 2-Disagree
    19 10% 1-Strongly Disagree
    33 18% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PRATT uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    31 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    40 22% 4-Agree
    45 24% 3-Neutral
    12 6% 2-Disagree
    16 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    41 22% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PRATT is a good administrator.
    33 18% 5-Strongly Agree
    42 23% 4-Agree
    44 24% 3-Neutral
    12 6% 2-Disagree
    18 10% 1-Strongly Disagree
    37 20% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PRATT effectively leads undergraduate programs and faculty.
    30 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    47 26% 4-Agree
    40 22% 3-Neutral
    10 6% 2-Disagree
    18 10% 1-Strongly Disagree
    33 19% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean PRATT competently administers Undergraduate Studies operations.
    34 18% 5-Strongly Agree
    46 25% 4-Agree
    39 21% 3-Neutral
    14 8% 2-Disagree
    18 10% 1-Strongly Disagree
    35 19% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean PRATT is:
    34 18% 5-Excellent
    38 21% 4-Above Average
    46 25% 3-Average
    13 7% 2-Below Average
    17 9% 1-Poor
    37 20% 0-Do Not Know

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    Florida Atlantic University Schools

    td height=”19″ align=”right”>3

    Principal/Director TAMMY FERGUSON consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    6 55% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 18% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    2 18% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director FERGUSON upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    7 64% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    2 18% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director FERGUSON makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    7 64% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    2 18% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director FERGUSON uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    7 64% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    2 18% 2-Disagree
    1 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director FERGUSON distributes discretionary money fairly.
    7 64% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 9% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 18% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director FERGUSON is a good administrator.
    8 73% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 9% 3-Neutral
    2 18% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director FERGUSON is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    8 73% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    1 9% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Principal/Director FERGUSON is:
    8 73% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    1 9% 3-Average
    2 18% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean JOEL HERBST consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    1 9% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 18% 4-Agree
    3 27% 3-Neutral
    2 18% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 27% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean HERBST upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    2 18% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 18% 4-Agree
    3 27% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 27% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean HERBST makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    2 18% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    27% 3-Neutral
    2 18% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 27% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean HERBST uses faculty governance processes to make decisions.
    1 9% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    3 27% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 45% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean HERBST distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 9% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 9% 4-Agree
    1 9% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    7 64% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean HERBST is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 18% 4-Agree
    6 55% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 18% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean HERBST is an effective leader who promotes the school.
    1 9% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 36% 4-Agree
    3 27% 3-Neutral
    1 9% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 18% 0-Do Not Know
    OVERALL, Assistant Dean HERBST is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    2 18% 4-Above Average
    6 55% 3-Average
    1 9% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    2 18% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean VALERIE BRISTOR consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 40% 4-Agree
    4 40% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 20% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Valerie BRISTOR upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    1 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 40% 4-Agree
    4 40% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 10% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    1 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 20% 4-Agree
    4 40% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 30% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR uses faculty governance processes to make decisions.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 20% 4-Agree
    4 40% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    4 40% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 11% 4-Agree
    3 33% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 56% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR is a good administrator.
    1 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 40% 4-Agree
    3 30% 3-Neutral
    1 10% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 10% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR is an effective leader who promotes the school.
    1 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 30% 4-Agree
    4 40% 3-Neutral
    1 10% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 10% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean BRISTOR is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    3 30% 4-Above Average
    5 50% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    2 20% 0-Do Not Know

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    Comments Off

  • Aug
    27

    August 27, 2013. Defending academic freedom, New bargaining agreement, Addressing disparities in faculty salaries, and more!

    Welcome back. Prepare to depressurize as you reenter the atmosphere of Planet FAU where alternative realities proliferate. Your friendly faculty union has been busy terraforming over the summer to make your world more habitable.

    We have been diligently defending academic freedom throughout the summer due to an overblown incident involving one of our instructors, Dr. Deandre Poole, in a classroom exercise. (See http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/04/01/interview-professor-center-jesus-debate-florida-atlantic for more details). Not only was the faculty union the first to vigorously defend academic freedom on campus and draw it to the attention of the national press, but it was also instrumental in bringing this issue before the Faculty Senate by asking to reconvene the Committee on Academic Freedom and Due Process, which had been defunct for years.

    The Committee then met for several months to compile a report criticizing the mismanagement of the incident by the university administration. (Read the report at http://www.fau.edu/ufsgov/Final%20AFDPC%20Report%206-24-2013.pdf). Because of the Committee’s conscientious work and the union’s determined defense of academic freedom, the instructor was finally rehired and the curriculum returned to faculty control. The incident reveals the strength of faculty when the union and faculty senate work together to clarify and strengthen the institutional values of the university.

    After more than a year of intense bargaining, we have finally ratified the 2012-2015 Collective Bargaining Agreement. Some of the highlights include the addition of paid parental leave, partner benefits, and a raise structure for instructors.

    We will soon begin bargaining for this year. Our main priority will be faculty raises. The administration has repeatedly stated during the spring semester that money is available for raises. Since we haven’t had a raise since 2010, we have fallen far beneath the pay of our sister institutions across the United States. According to the American Association of University Professors, FAU full professor salaries on average lag behind their peers at other institutions by $18,000 and associate professors on average lag by $6,000. (See http://chronicle.com/article/faculty-salaries-data-2012/131431#id=133669). This reveals the inversion and compression of salary that accrues the longer faculty remain with our institution. Such an illogical salary structure discourages loyalty and long-term commitment from faculty who often feel increasingly exploited the longer they stay at FAU.

    Even more troubling, according to Florida Trend, FAU administration has grown 1.5% from 2007 to 2011 while new full-time tenure-track lines were cut by 40% during the same time period. As a result, faculty workloads have increased in regards to teaching and service while our salaries have stagnated. We will soon be releasing an independent study of faculty salaries compared to administration salaries for the last five years at FAU in order to document the relative allocation of resources.

    In regard to the promotional structure established for instructors, the union is requesting assistance from instructors who have recently been promoted to help lead a fall portfolio workshop for instructors applying for promotion in the upcoming academic year. We would like for you to model your portfolio as well as explain any issues that arose while going through the process and field any questions that faculty might have. If you are interested in participating, please contact Chris Robé at president@uff-fau.org. Portfolios are due in the Provost’s office by February 14, 2014. They will be due in your departments even earlier. Be sure to check with your department head about his/her specific deadline.

    We will be holding a consultation this fall. Two main concerns are following up on academic freedom with the administration to ensure their commitment to this central principle and addressing the negative effects of larger class caps on teaching, learning, and student retention. If you have other concerns you would like the union to address during consultation, let us know: president@uff-fau.org.

    New faculty luncheon will be held on September 27 from 11:30 am-1:30 PM in Live Oak Room A. All faculty are welcome to attend. Members should feel free to bring non-members and introduce them to our fine union folk. We will also be holding monthly happy hours at The Irishmen Pub, 1745 NW 2nd Ave. Stay tuned for updates regarding its dates. We hope to see you at our upcoming functions. The union, after all, is not simply about representing the collective faculty voice, but also gathering faculty together to share ideas and concerns in order to better implement our vision of what FAU should be. If you haven’t joined yet, download an application at http://www.uff-fau.org/?cat=3 and send it in to Chris Robé, CU 214, School of Communication, Boca Raton Campus or take it to the next union function you attend and hand it to one of the union officers. Look forward to seeing you soon.

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Chris Robé
School of Communication
561-297-1306
president@uff-fau.org

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