UFF-FAU

United Faculty of Florida-Florida Atlantic University Chapter

  • Sep
    8

    September 8, 2012. President Saunders panned for “micromanaging” university, disrespect of faculty, lack of transparency and dubious approaches to budget crisis, Provost Claiborne faulted for poor communication with faculty, cutbacks in teaching, and “a swirling vortex of comically stupid [credentialing] decisions.”

    Processing of the 2011-2012 UFF-FAU Faculty Survey on Administrator Performance is now complete. A total of 189 responses were received from faculty at all colleges and FAU campuses. An overall summary of faculty members’ written comments is provided below.

    Word-for-word faculty responses on specific administrators have been published in a password-protected area of the website. Faculty will be provided with a password via email to access these.

    Overview and summary of written comments.

    President Mary J. Saunders received 144 comments, most of them critical of her actions. A strong critique involved the micromanaging of the university and a lack of respect for faculty. One faculty member comments: “She seems very distant from the faculty and speaks in generalities that are very difficult to decipher. She needs to make more of an effort connecting with and explaining herself to faculty, as well as listening more effectively.” Another routine critique was a lack of transparency regarding resources and the academic processes of the university. Faculty have also questioned the viability of the growth of university. As one faculty member writes, “The idea that we can grow our way out of the budget crisis is suspect. Adding students without investing in tenure-line faculty and infrastructure, as Dr. Saunders appears to be doing, degrades the quality of education for our students.” Even sympathetic comments still note she should “consider reducing the salaries and/or numbers of senior administrators on her team” since most faculty, as we will see in the other survey comments, have no idea of the purpose behind many of these new administrative lines.

    Provost Brenda Claiborne received 121 comments. The problematic summer policy dominated many comments and led to a general negative opinion of the provost’s actions. As one faculty members observes, “I had formed no strong opinion until the summer fiasco. The one-size-fits-all plan is illogical and ineffective. This is the first time in my 35 years here that top-down plan has occurred. It makes no sense.” Similarly, another faculty member warns, “Do everything necessary to AVOID cutting classes in a university. It is as if a shoe shop stopped selling shoes.” This policy, according to many faculty, seems to stem from a lack of communication and interaction with faculty. One person notes, “The Provost seems like a very nice person. But she has done a terrible job of communicating with faculty and as a result, her decision-making seems arbitrary and heavy-handed. The debacle around course sizes is only the latest example.” Also, the handling of credentialing was another consistent critique. One person notes, “Having to explain to the provost the basics of a variety of disciplines and how they are run is embarrassing for both the one doing the explanation and the one having to receive it. The appearance of dictatorial actions and coercion has done nothing for the moral[e] of the University.” Another comment: “The accreditation process has already turned into a swirling vortex of comically stupid decisions.” Another comment: “I am also surprised at the level of rigidness in interpreting the SACs directives towards credentialing. When one pulls up the SACS description of credentialing, it is clear that the university is ignoring several paragraphs of discussion regarding appropriate credentials in order to enforce FAU’s mission, whatever that is.” Yet another: “Follow SACS guidelines in the manner that every SACS accredited institution does.” The comments continue. As you know, UFF-FAU has written a report on SACS and requested a meeting with the provost and those in charge of SACS. We are still pressing for a reply and meeting.

    Associate Provost of Northern Campuses Eliah Watlington received around two dozen comments. In general, no one knows who he is and questions the relevancy of the position.

    Associate Provost of Broward Campuses Anthony Abbate received nine comments mostly noting that he needs to be more assertive for faculty rights and “build a stronger sense of identity and community among Broward faculty and students.”

    Interim Vice-President of Research Barry Rosson received 90 comments, all uniformly negative. Many people commented about the seemingly irrelevancy of the graduate college and the endless, meaningless paperwork it blossoms. One faculty member cautions: “Stop building a bureaucratic empire that does nothing but generate paperwork for those of us working in the graduate program.” Another faculty member suggests that Rosson “has made an unbelievable mess out of the Graduate College, screwing-up even the most basic tasks. The labyrinthine and Byzantine forms are an obvious example.” Another faculty encourages: “The Graduate College should be eliminated. It duplicates services. It is unfriendly to students and faculty.”

    Interim Dean of Arts and Letters Heather Coltman received 84 mixed responses. The positive comments suggest that she is doing her best during a very bad financial crisis and a hostile state legislature. One faculty member writes, “She is doing a great job despite these ridiculous financial restrictions.” The negative comments suggest that Dean Coltman lacks the needed experience to function as a Dean and badly represents faculty interests. One faculty member writes, “Interim Dean Coltman is inexperienced, and during her time as dean has been entirely ineffective . . . She has poor judgment, does not understand the academic programs in the college, and has made a series of disastrous decisions.”

    Dean of Undergraduate Studies Ed Pratt received 27 mixed comments. On the positive side faculty believe he “does the best he can in these unsettled times.” On the critical end, faculty believe he needs to show more initiative in “addressing the needs of effective undergraduate education.”

    Dean of the College of Science Gary Perry received 16 comments. Many view him as one of FAU’s best deans. The main negative comments stated that he “should fight for the faculty and students” more.

    Dean of Nursing Marlaine Smith received 8 comments. About half complimented her as an “outstanding, supportive, and generous” dean. Two comments suggested that Smith be more visible among faculty and better listen to them.

    Dean Rosalyn Carter of the College for Design and Social Inquiry received 4 comments. They suggest that Carter act in a more professional manner and involve faculty more in decision-making processes.

    Dean of Business Denis Coates received 7 comments. They generally suggest that Coates needs to work on better managing various departments and improving faculty governance. They also suggest that he needs to better his communication skills.

    Interim Dean of Engineering Mohammad Ilyas received 6 largely positive comments. They suggest he is an excellent leader and would like to see him become permanent dean.

    University Libraries Dean William Miller received 3 comments. They suggest that he needs to be more directly involved in decision-making processes.

    Dean of Education Valerie Bristor received 23 comments. They generally suggest that she needs to better manage the departments and their chairs. Some comments suggest that she was better suited in the role of associate dean.

    Principal Tammy Ferguson of the Henderson School received 7 comments. They were generally positive, but a few suggested that she better communicate with the faculty.

    Dean Jeffrey Buller of the Honors College received 7 comments. They commented on his general absence on the Jupiter campus and the overall resulting demoralization of the college.

    Quantitative Breakdown of Administrator Survey Data

    Link to:

    Heather Coltman, Interim Dean, College of Arts and Letters

    Interim Dean Heather Coltman upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    26 37% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 10% 4-Agree
    10 14% 3-Neutral
    8 11% 2-Disagree
    18 26% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean Coltman makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    21 30% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 13% 4-Agree
    7 10% 3-Neutral
    8 11% 2-Disagree
    19 27% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 7% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean Coltman uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    23 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    10 14% 4-Agree
    5 7% 3-Neutral
    11 16% 2-Disagree
    17 24% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 4% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean Coltman distributes discretionary money fairly.
    10 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    6 9% 4-Agree
    3 4% 3-Neutral
    6 9% 2-Disagree
    15 21% 1-Strongly Disagree
    29 41% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean Coltman is a good administrator.
    20 29% 5-Strongly Agree
    10 14% 4-Agree
    9 13% 3-Neutral
    9 13% 2-Disagree
    17 24% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 1% 0-Do Not Know
    Interim Dean Coltman is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    26 37% 5-Strongly Agree
    8 11% 4-Agree
    4 6% 3-Neutral
    6 9% 2-Disagree
    22 31% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 3% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Interim Dean Coltman is:
    22 31% 5-Excellent
    11 16% 4-Above Average
    6 9% 3-Average
    8 11% 2-Below Average
    22 31% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    J. Dennis Coates, Dean, College of Business

    Dean J. DENNIS COATES consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    3 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 50% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 6% 2-Disagree
    4 22% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 6% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean COATES upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    4 22% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 39% 4-Agree
    4 22% 3-Neutral
    1 6% 2-Disagree
    2 11% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean COATES makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    3 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 39% 4-Agree
    1 6% 3-Neutral
    3 17% 2-Disagree
    4 22% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean COATES uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    4 22% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 28% 4-Agree
    2 11% 3-Neutral
    1 6% 2-Disagree
    4 22% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 6% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean COATES distributes discretionary money fairly.
    3 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 28% 4-Agree
    3 17% 3-Neutral
    1 6% 2-Disagree
    4 22% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 6% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean COATES is a good administrator.
    4 22% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 39% 4-Agree
    2 11% 3-Neutral
    1 6% 2-Disagree
    4 22% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean COATES is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    4 22% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 22% 4-Agree
    3 17% 3-Neutral
    3 17% 2-Disagree
    3 17% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean COATES is:
    4 22% 5-Excellent
    6 33% 4-Above Average
    2 11% 3-Average
    1 6% 2-Below Average
    5 28% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Rosalyn Carter, Dean, College of Design and Social Inquiry

    Dean ROSALYN CARTER consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 14% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    3 43% 2-Disagree
    3 43% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    1 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 14% 4-Agree
    3 43% 3-Neutral
    1 14% 2-Disagree
    1 14% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 14% 4-Agree
    1 14% 3-Neutral
    2 29% 2-Disagree
    3 43% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 29% 4-Agree
    2 29% 3-Neutral
    2 29% 2-Disagree
    1 14% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    3 43% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    3 43% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 14% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 14% 4-Agree
    2 29% 3-Neutral
    1 14% 2-Disagree
    3 43% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean CARTER is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 29% 4-Agree
    3 43% 3-Neutral
    2 29% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean CARTER is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    2 29% 4-Above Average
    1 14% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    4 57% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Valerie Bristor, College of Education

    Dean VALERIE BRISTOR consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    2 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 30% 4-Agree
    8 27% 3-Neutral
    4 13% 2-Disagree
    7 23% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    2 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 17% 4-Agree
    9 30% 3-Neutral
    6 20% 2-Disagree
    7 23% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 3% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    3 10% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 23% 4-Agree
    8 27% 3-Neutral
    5 17% 2-Disagree
    5 17% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 7% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    4 13% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 30% 4-Agree
    8 27% 3-Neutral
    3 10% 2-Disagree
    4 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 3% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 23% 4-Agree
    7 23% 3-Neutral
    5 17% 2-Disagree
    5 17% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 17% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR is a good administrator.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 13% 4-Agree
    11 37% 3-Neutral
    10 33% 2-Disagree
    2 7% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 7% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BRISTOR is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 10% 4-Agree
    6 20% 3-Neutral
    12 40% 2-Disagree
    7 23% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 3% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean BRISTOR is:
    2 7% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    14 47% 3-Average
    9 30% 2-Below Average
    5 17% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Mohammad Ilyas, Interim Dean, College of Engineering and Computer Science

    Dean Mohammad Ilyas upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    4 44% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 44% 4-Agree
    1 11% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Ilyas makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    4 44% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 56% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Ilyas uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    4 44% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 33% 4-Agree
    1 11% 3-Neutral
    1 11% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Ilyas distributes discretionary money fairly.
    3 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 22% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    4 44% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Ilyas is a good administrator.
    4 44% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 44% 4-Agree
    1 11% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Ilyas is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    4 44% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 22% 4-Agree
    2 22% 3-Neutral
    1 11% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Ilyas is:
    4 44% 5-Excellent
    4 44% 4-Above Average
    0 0% 3-Average
    1 11% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    Florida Atlantic University Schools

    Principal/Director Ferguson consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    7 58% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 17% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    2 17% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director Ferguson upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    9 75% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 17% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director Ferguson makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    7 58% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    2 17% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    2 17% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 8% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director Ferguson uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    7 58% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 17% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    2 17% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director Ferguson distributes discretionary money fairly.
    6 50% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 17% 4-Agree
    1 8% 3-Neutral
    2 17% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 8% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director Ferguson is a good administrator.
    9 75% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 8% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Principal/Director Ferguson is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    9 75% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 8% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Principal/Director Ferguson is:
    9 75% 5-Excellent
    1 8% 4-Above Average
    1 8% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    1 8% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean GLENN THOMAS consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 25% 4-Agree
    1 8% 3-Neutral
    2 17% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    2 17% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean THOMAS upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    5 42% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 25% 4-Agree
    1 8% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean THOMAS makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 25% 4-Agree
    3 25% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 8% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean THOMAS uses faculty governance processes to make decisions.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 25% 4-Agree
    4 33% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 8% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean THOMAS distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 25% 4-Agree
    3 25% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 8% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean THOMAS is a good administrator.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    6 50% 4-Agree
    1 8% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Assistant Dean THOMAS is an effective leader who promotes the school.
    3 25% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 33% 4-Agree
    1 8% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    OVERALL, Assistant Dean THOMAS is:
    2 17% 5-Excellent
    5 42% 4-Above Average
    2 17% 3-Average
    1 8% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 42% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 8% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    1 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 25% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 8% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    4 33% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor uses faculty governance processes to make decisions.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 17% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 8% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 25% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 42% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor is a good administrator.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    2 17% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    4 33% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Bristor is an effective leader who promotes the school.
    1 8% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    2 17% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    4 33% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Bristor is:
    1 8% 5-Excellent
    0 0% 4-Above Average
    1 8% 3-Average
    1 8% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    4 33% 0-Do Not Know

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    Barry Rosson, Graduate College

    Graduate College Dean Barry Rosson consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    3 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    8 5% 4-Agree
    24 16% 3-Neutral
    31 20% 2-Disagree
    50 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    36 24% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Rosson upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    11 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    18 12% 4-Agree
    25 16% 3-Neutral
    26 17% 2-Disagree
    34 22% 1-Strongly Disagree
    38 25% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Rosson uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    3 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    11 7% 4-Agree
    21 14% 3-Neutral
    33 22% 2-Disagree
    44 29% 1-Strongly Disagree
    40 26% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Rosson is a good administrator.
    5 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 6% 4-Agree
    33 22% 3-Neutral
    25 16% 2-Disagree
    43 28% 1-Strongly Disagree
    37 24% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Rosson effectively leads University Graduate education programs and faculty.
    6 4% 5-Strongly Agree
    11 7% 4-Agree
    32 21% 3-Neutral
    23 15% 2-Disagree
    45 30% 1-Strongly Disagree
    32 21% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Rosson competently administers Graduate College operations.
    6 4% 5-Strongly Agree
    11 7% 4-Agree
    30 20% 3-Neutral
    23 15% 2-Disagree
    42 28% 1-Strongly Disagree
    40 26% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Rosson is:
    6 4% 5-Excellent
    6 4% 4-Above Average
    33 22% 3-Average
    23 15% 2-Below Average
    47 31% 1-Poor
    36 24% 0-Do Not Know

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    Jeffrey Buller, Dean, Honors College

    Dean JEFFREY BULLER consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 50% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    1 17% 2-Disagree
    2 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    1 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 50% 4-Agree
    0 0% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    2 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 17% 4-Agree
    1 17% 3-Neutral
    1 17% 2-Disagree
    3 50% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 33% 4-Agree
    1 17% 3-Neutral
    1 17% 2-Disagree
    2 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER distributes discretionary money fairly.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 33% 4-Agree
    1 17% 3-Neutral
    1 17% 2-Disagree
    2 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER is a good administrator.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 17% 4-Agree
    1 17% 3-Neutral
    1 17% 2-Disagree
    2 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean BULLER is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    0 0% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    2 33% 3-Neutral
    2 33% 2-Disagree
    2 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean BULLER is:
    0 0% 5-Excellent
    1 17% 4-Above Average
    2 33% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    3 50% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

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    William Miller, Dean, University Libraries

    Dean William Miller upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    1 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 33% 4-Agree
    1 33% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Miller makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    1 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 33% 3-Neutral
    1 33% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Miller uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    1 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 33% 3-Neutral
    1 33% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Miller distributes discretionary money fairly.
    1 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    1 33% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Miller is a good administrator.
    1 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 33% 4-Agree
    1 33% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Miller is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    1 33% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 33% 4-Agree
    1 33% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Miller is:
    1 33% 5-Excellent
    1 33% 4-Above Average
    1 33% 3-Average
    0 0% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

    David J. Bjorkman, Dean, College of Medicine

    No Results

    top

    Marlaine Smith, Dean, College of Nursing

    Dean Marlaine Smith upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    5 63% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 13% 4-Agree
    1 13% 3-Neutral
    1 13% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Smith makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    1 13% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 38% 4-Agree
    3 38% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Smith uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    2 25% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 38% 4-Agree
    2 25% 3-Neutral
    1 13% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Smith distributes discretionary money fairly.
    2 25% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 13% 4-Agree
    2 25% 3-Neutral
    1 13% 2-Disagree
    1 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 13% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Smith is a good administrator.
    2 25% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 38% 4-Agree
    2 25% 3-Neutral
    1 13% 2-Disagree
    0 0% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Smith is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    3 38% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 25% 4-Agree
    2 25% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    1 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Smith is:
    2 25% 5-Excellent
    3 38% 4-Above Average
    2 25% 3-Average
    1 13% 2-Below Average
    0 0% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Gary Perry, Dean, College of Science

    Dean Gary Perry upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    12 50% 5-Strongly Agree
    5 21% 4-Agree
    2 8% 3-Neutral
    4 17% 2-Disagree
    1 4% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Perry makes personnel decisions in a professional, unbiased manner.
    10 42% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 17% 4-Agree
    5 21% 3-Neutral
    3 13% 2-Disagree
    2 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Perry uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    7 29% 5-Strongly Agree
    7 29% 4-Agree
    3 13% 3-Neutral
    3 13% 2-Disagree
    1 4% 1-Strongly Disagree
    3 13% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Perry distributes discretionary money fairly.
    4 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    6 25% 4-Agree
    1 4% 3-Neutral
    2 8% 2-Disagree
    4 17% 1-Strongly Disagree
    7 29% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Perry is a good administrator.
    11 46% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 17% 4-Agree
    4 17% 3-Neutral
    2 8% 2-Disagree
    2 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    1 4% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Perry is an effective leader who promotes the college/unit.
    13 54% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 13% 4-Agree
    2 8% 3-Neutral
    3 13% 2-Disagree
    3 13% 1-Strongly Disagree
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Perry is:
    11 46% 5-Excellent
    3 13% 4-Above Average
    4 17% 3-Average
    3 13% 2-Below Average
    3 13% 1-Poor
    0 0% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Edward Pratt, Dean, Undergraduate Studies

    Undergraduate Studies Dean Edward Pratt consults faculty/staff before making important decisions.
    16 11% 5-Strongly Agree
    33 23% 4-Agree
    20 14% 3-Neutral
    23 16% 2-Disagree
    12 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    42 29% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Pratt upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    25 17% 5-Strongly Agree
    33 22% 4-Agree
    29 20% 3-Neutral
    13 9% 2-Disagree
    12 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    35 24% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Pratt uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    20 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    29 20% 4-Agree
    21 14% 3-Neutral
    13 9% 2-Disagree
    10 7% 1-Strongly Disagree
    52 36% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Pratt is a good administrator.
    21 15% 5-Strongly Agree
    34 24% 4-Agree
    26 18% 3-Neutral
    14 10% 2-Disagree
    10 7% 1-Strongly Disagree
    39 27% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Pratt effectively leads undergraduate programs and faculty.
    20 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    33 23% 4-Agree
    24 16% 3-Neutral
    16 11% 2-Disagree
    12 8% 1-Strongly Disagree
    41 28% 0-Do Not Know
    Dean Pratt competently administers Undergraduate Studies operations.
    23 16% 5-Strongly Agree
    34 23% 4-Agree
    20 14% 3-Neutral
    17 12% 2-Disagree
    9 6% 1-Strongly Disagree
    44 30% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Dean Pratt is:
    22 15% 5-Excellent
    32 22% 4-Above Average
    27 19% 3-Average
    13 9% 2-Below Average
    11 8% 1-Poor
    39 27% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Anthony Abbatte, Associate Provost of the Broward Campuses (Answers provided by faculty from the Broward Campuses.)

    Associate Provost of Broward Campuses Anthony Abbatte is a good administrator.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    4 10% 4-Agree
    9 23% 3-Neutral
    1 3% 2-Disagree
    1 3% 1-Strongly Disagree
    23 59% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Abbatte uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 5% 4-Agree
    5 14% 3-Neutral
    1 3% 2-Disagree
    2 5% 1-Strongly Disagree
    26 70% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Abbatte keeps faculty informed about decisions.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 10% 4-Agree
    7 17% 3-Neutral
    1 14% 2-Disagree
    6 21% 1-Strongly Disagree
    16 34% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Abbatte ensures that campus fiscal resources are appropriately allotted and expended.
    2 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    0 0% 4-Agree
    5 15% 3-Neutral
    0 0% 2-Disagree
    3 9% 1-Strongly Disagree
    23 70% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Abbatte is competent in overseeing daily campus operations.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 3% 4-Agree
    4 13% 3-Neutral
    2 6% 2-Disagree
    2 6% 1-Strongly Disagree
    22 69% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Abbatte is an effective leader who promotes the development of the campus
    2 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    1 3% 4-Agree
    5 15% 3-Neutral
    2 6% 2-Disagree
    2 6% 1-Strongly Disagree
    21 64% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Associate Provost Abbatte is:
    1 3% 5-Excellent
    1 3% 4-Above Average
    6 18% 3-Average
    2 6% 2-Below Average
    2 6% 1-Poor
    21 63% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Eliah Watlington, Associate Provost of the Northern Campuses (Answers provided by faculty from the Northern Campuses.)

    Associate Provost of Northern Campuses Eliah Watlington is a good administrator.
    4 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 7% 4-Agree
    4 14% 3-Neutral
    2 7% 2-Disagree
    4 14% 1-Strongly Disagree
    13 45% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Watlington uses faculty governance processes to make decisions in a collegial manner.
    2 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 10% 4-Agree
    4 14% 3-Neutral
    3 10% 2-Disagree
    2 7% 1-Strongly Disagree
    15 52% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Watlington keeps faculty informed about decisions.
    1 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 10% 4-Agree
    5 17% 3-Neutral
    4 14% 2-Disagree
    6 21% 1-Strongly Disagree
    10 34% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Watlington ensures that campus fiscal resources are appropriately allotted and expended.
    2 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    3 10% 4-Agree
    3 10% 3-Neutral
    3 10% 2-Disagree
    3 10% 1-Strongly Disagree
    15 52% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Watlington is competent in overseeing daily campus operations.
    2 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 7% 4-Agree
    3 11% 3-Neutral
    4 15% 2-Disagree
    3 11% 1-Strongly Disagree
    13 48% 0-Do Not Know
    Associate Provost Watlington is an effective leader who promotes the development of the campus
    3 11% 5-Strongly Agree
    2 7% 4-Agree
    1 4% 3-Neutral
    6 21% 2-Disagree
    5 18% 1-Strongly Disagree
    11 39% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Associate Provost Watlington is:
    2 7% 5-Excellent
    2 7% 4-Above Average
    2 7% 3-Average
    7 24% 2-Below Average
    5 17% 1-Poor
    11 38% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Brenda Claiborne, University Provost

    Provost Brenda Claiborne is a good administrator.
    9 5% 5-Strongly Agree
    10 6% 4-Agree
    42 24% 3-Neutral
    36 21% 2-Disagree
    52 30% 1-Strongly Disagree
    26 15% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost Claiborne uses faculty governance processes to make decisions.
    6 3% 5-Strongly Agree
    9 5% 4-Agree
    32 18% 3-Neutral
    34 20% 2-Disagree
    64 37% 1-Strongly Disagree
    29 17% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost Claiborne keeps faculty informed about decisions.
    10 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    23 14% 4-Agree
    32 19% 3-Neutral
    30 18% 2-Disagree
    56 34% 1-Strongly Disagree
    14 8% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost Claiborne makes sure that Vice-Presidents and Deans make fair decisions.
    4 2% 5-Strongly Agree
    6 4% 4-Agree
    30 18% 3-Neutral
    20 12% 2-Disagree
    55 32% 1-Strongly Disagree
    55 32% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost Claiborne upholds academic standards and maintains a scholarly atmosphere.
    10 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    20 12% 4-Agree
    38 22% 3-Neutral
    30 18% 2-Disagree
    48 28% 1-Strongly Disagree
    24 14% 0-Do Not Know
    Provost Claiborne is an effective leader who promotes the development of the University.
    8 5% 5-Strongly Agree
    10 6% 4-Agree
    32 19% 3-Neutral
    34 20% 2-Disagree
    59 35% 1-Strongly Disagree
    28 16% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, Provost Claiborne is:
    9 5% 5-Excellent
    8 5% 4-Above Average
    39 23% 3-Average
    30 18% 2-Below Average
    59 35% 1-Poor
    26 15% 0-Do Not Know

    top

    Mary Jane Saunders, University President

    President Mary Jane Saunders makes sure that administrators make decisions fairly and in the best interests of the University.
    11 6% 5-Strongly Agree
    32 19% 4-Agree
    35 20% 3-Neutral
    35 20% 2-Disagree
    45 26% 1-Strongly Disagree
    14 8% 0-Do Not Know
    President Saunders makes decisions that are in the best interests of the faculty and professional staff.
    13 7% 5-Strongly Agree
    18 10% 4-Agree
    38 22% 3-Neutral
    44 25% 2-Disagree
    57 33% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 3% 0-Do Not Know
    President Saunders upholds academic standards and encourages a scholarly atmosphere.
    21 12% 5-Strongly Agree
    40 23% 4-Agree
    36 21% 3-Neutral
    24 14% 2-Disagree
    48 28% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 3% 0-Do Not Know
    President Saunders is an effective leader who promotes the development of the University.
    24 14% 5-Strongly Agree
    37 22% 4-Agree
    34 20% 3-Neutral
    22 13% 2-Disagree
    51 29% 1-Strongly Disagree
    5 3% 0-Do Not Know
    Overall, President Saunders is:
    13 7% 5-Excellent
    36 21% 4-Above Average
    41 24% 3-Average
    29 17% 2-Below Average
    50 29% 1-Poor
    5 3% 0-Do Not Know

    Comments Off

  • May
    29

    May 29, 2012. After a hasty reorganization of the College of Engineering three years ago FAU administrators summarily fired five tenured faculty members

    UFF Will Fight Layoffs of Tenured Professors

    June 3, 2009. It is not the easiest thing to introduce oneself in the midst of a crisis, so I will hold off on such formalities for now. On Friday, May 29 three Associate Professors and two Full Professors in the College of Engineering received layoff notices effective August 8th. All five faculty members were tenured. This action by the FAU Administration is a violation of the Collective Bargaining Agreement, which stipulates a seniority process in the event of layoffs and requires that tenured and tenure-track faculty be given one year notification prior to termination. Moreover, with plenty of funds in reserve FAU administrators cannot claim financial urgency, which would in fact be a precondition of such drastic action.

    UFF-FAU intends to fight for these faculty members through the grievance process assured under the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Without the CBA there would be little recourse for faculty aside from costly legal battles, and virtually nothing would stand in the way of the administration terminating even wider swaths of faculty.

    The would be necessity of FAU’s “reorganization” and resultant layoffs of faculty and staff rests on administrators’ argument that the institution is suffering from a shortage of recurring state funds. Shortly after postponing a 10% salary increase of his own after faculty criticism, President Frank Brogan seldom missed an opportunity to make proclamations of future job losses and overall financial austerity. Yet here’s the rub: FAU is sitting on over $70 million in reserves–enough for independent authorities and a Special Magistrate to conclude in March that the university was capable of a minimum salary increase for all faculty of 150% more than it grudgingly granted in April (1%). Further, UFF-FAU’s study, How is the Money Spent? FAU Expenditures on Faculty and Higher Level Administration in the Period from 2001-02 to 2008-09, provides solid evidence of the growth of administrative positions and salaries versus those who actually see the inside of a classroom.

    To be sure, the Florida legislature has cut its support to state universities, but there are no cutbacks in the 2009-10 budget, and past shortfalls will to a significant degree be made up for in tuition increases and federal stimulus money–the latter of which is specifically intended to prevent layoffs.

    When a family loses a small portion of its income it must turn to some of its reserves in order to sustain its normal functioning. No self-respecting family would think of putting its children up for adoption or placing them on the auction block as a result of such circumstances, particularly if it’s sitting on millions of dollars. In a similar vein, when a university invites a scholar to fill a tenure-track post and grants her tenure it makes that individual part of its family–bestowing the assurance of some job security as a reward for dedication and hard work. This is what five of our fellow faculty members believed before May 29. By terminating tenured faculty the FAU administration has sown the seeds of distrust and fear among those who carry on the institution’s most important work–teaching, research, and service. Unfortunately, under the present administration this is only a small foretaste of what is likely in store. If you are not already a member I encourage you to consider joining UFF-FAU today.

    In solidarity,

    James Tracy
    UFF-FAU President

    See related posts:

    No Comment: 2009

    CHE News Blog: Union Protests Layoff of Five Tenured Professors as Florida Atlantic U. Slashes Its Budget

    Shake Hands with the Devil

    Engineering Faculty Vents Frustration

    UFF-FAU President Tracy Asks FAU Administration to Address Engineering Faculty Discontent, Reorganization

    Comments Off

  • May
    16
    May 16, 2012. University Press publishes revealing exposé on Florida Atlantic University’s Board of Trustees, “[H]alf the board members have bankruptcy filings, foreclosures, or other financial problems in their past.”
    FAU Board of Trustees group photoThe Board of Trustees with President Mary Jane Saunders (center). Photo courtesy of FAU Media Relations.

    Experience. Leadership. Management. Philanthropy. Awards.

    These are the words FAU’s Board of Trustees members used to describe themselves when they applied to join the board.

    Bankruptcy filings. Foreclosures. Tax warrants. Court orders to pay debts.

    These are the words they neglected to mention.

    As FAU’s highest-ranking leaders, the trustees make FAU’s biggest financial and academic decisions. Their actions affect the entire university community — students, faculty, administrators, staff, alumni.

    But a University Press investigation also found federal lawsuits, job performance complaints, a federal tax lien, and an eviction order in their past.

    Read more at upressonline.com

    No Comments

  • May
    14

    May 14, 2012. The faculty protest in late April was a last resort after the non-responsiveness of FAU administrators. What did we achieve?

    First of all, I would thank all faculty and staff who participated in the summer teaching protest held on April 18. As you all know, the protest just didn’t concern itself with summer teaching, but more importantly the way in which faculty have been systematically excluded from most decision-making processes recently implemented by the upper administration. Only after the fact is faculty input solicited. We are hoping as a result of such negative publicity that the administration will start implementing policies where faculty have been an integral part from the inception. I will be meeting with the provost later this month to discuss this problem and see how we can move forward regarding this.

    The union doesn’t take protesting lightly. We have attempted to use other more formal channels– consultation, meeting with the upper administration through more informal settings, asking questions during faculty assemblies and the senate, but felt that our concerns were not being taken seriously. As a result, we felt that we had no option other than focusing the public eye on the ways in which faculty, students, and staff feel how that the university has been mismanaged.  In this effort we were successful.  In addition to attracting at least seventy faculty, staff and students to our protest rally on the 18th, and helping students publicize their own earlier protest rally, we received good publicity in a variety of media.   See the links to local media in previous posts on the protests here at uff-fau.org.

    The results were  productive:

    1)      We finally received a belated memo from the administration on April  10 regarding the rationale for the implementation of summer policy.

    2)      Administrators started to reinstitute courses more promptly.

    3)      The administration publicly acknowledged that the implementation of the summer policy was misguided.

    4)      After repeated calls by the union since Fall 2011 for a Town Hall Budget meeting, the upper administration finally held one. The result  was far from satisfactory. Although we would much rather have had the President and the Provost directly fielding questions, the meeting at  least provided a public forum where faculty could directly address some of their concerns and judge for themselves the adequacy of the responses.

    But of course the proof is in the proverbial pudding. We’ll see how future administrative policies are made and implemented and if faculty governance and knowledge is respected. We understand that FAU has been placed in a difficult economic situation because of the hostility by many in the state legislature in regards toward public education.

    This damage has been compounded by misguided policies on the local level that seem distinctly out of touch with faculty concerns and expertise and thus destructive of some core goals of the university, its discipline-specific teaching and research programs. But for now we look to the future by attempting to establish a more  functional and balanced relationship with the upper administration. As you know, the union provides a forum for the only independent collective voice of the faculty. But only faculty can make this voice be adequately heard not only by joining the union, but also by becoming more involved in it.

    The union repeatedly and rigorously addresses issues that many faculty members articulate to one another but might be uncomfortable pronouncing on their own to the administration.  But the union gives you an independent, collective  voice across department, college and campus boundaries. Your involvement makes us a more effective, democratic, well-informed, and vigorous university. Please download a membership form by clicking here today. Send to Chris Robe’, FAU, CU 215, Boca Raton, FL 33431.

    Have a good summer!

    Chris

    No Comments

  • Apr
    24

    April 24, 2012. “The president has a house and a car and makes so and so millions of dollars. Where’s her cut?” –FAU student Monique Paramore.

    (aired April 23, 2012)

    BOCA RATON, Fla. — Budget cuts at Florida Atlantic University. For weeks teachers and faculty have protested after they found out FAU needed to cut $24.7 million. Those cuts will include satellite campuses, and some summer classes. Monday FAU’s Senior VP of Finance laid out what would be chopped.

    The forum first kicking off with the Vice President of FAU’s Finance Department Dennis Crudele, revealing the budget numbers.

    “We’ve gone from $181 million to $92 million and you can’t take that kind of reduction without having to really look at and assess your core values,” said Crudele.

    After that, going over the budget plan that if approved, would eliminate campuses in Port St. Lucie and Fort Lauderdale.

    Read more and view video at cbs12.com

    No Comments

  • Apr
    24

    April 24, 2012. Targeted campuses “are not making any profit,” says FAU Vice President for Finance Dennis Crudele

    By Scott Travis

    (April 24, 2012)

    The faculty at Florida Atlantic University are usually united in opposing most budget cuts — unless it involves closing down small campuses.

    A proposal to close the downtown Fort Lauderdale tower and the Treasure Coast campus inPort St. Lucie is alarming to those at the campuses. But many faculty at other campuses see it as a good way to deal with a $10 million budget hole, according to a website FAU created to get ideas on ways to cut the budget. A final decision is expected in June, but most at FAU think the proposals are a done deal.

    “We’re a minority and a very small faculty, and we can’t make a lot of noise,” said Stephanie Cunningham, a graphic design professor at the Fort Lauderdale campus. “And we’re in the last week of classes. We don’t really have the time to organize a protest, and in the summer, there will be so few students on campus.”

    Read more at sunsentinel.com

    No Comments

  • Apr
    18

    April 18, 2012. FAU community voices concerns over M J Saunders administration’s arbitrary decisions on summer classes, increased class sizes

    UFF-FAU Chapter President Chris Robe begins rally to “Save Summer” Outside Williams Admin Building

    Numerous students addressed rally participants on how the summer cuts have affected them

    FAU Faculty donned their regalia to express concerns over administrators’ heavy-handed approach to summer

    No Comments

  • Apr
    13

    April 13, 2012. Nearly a third of summer session classes have been canceled

    (April 12, 2012)

    College students in Florida are getting a real-world lesson in economics as the effects of $300 million in budget cuts are starting to hit home.

    At Florida Atlantic University, nearly a third of classes in the normally bustling summer session have been canceled, after the school took a nearly $25 million hit. Florida International University is deferring some maintenance projects and delaying hiring while the University of Florida has asked its departments to cut about 5 percent from their budgets.

    At the same time, state universities are expected to increase tuition by 15 percent for the fourth year in a row.

    “To have 15 percent increases year after year is unfair to students,” said Ayden Maher, president of FAU’s student government.

    Read more and watch video report at sun-sentinel.com

    No Comments

  • Apr
    13

    April 13, 2012. CBS News 12 reports chanting students storm administration building with bullhorn

    (April 12, 2012)

    BOCA RATON, Fla. — Students at Florida Atlantic University gathered today to protest against budget cuts that are forcing some of their classes to be cancelled.

    Students protested outside the administration building Thursday afternoon. They’re angry over what they call unfair and arbitrary reductions in summer courses. Almost 1,000 courses have been cut this year.

    Protestors held signs and chanted “cut our courses, cut our future.” They stood on the administration building steps and at one point even went inside to confront school officials, but they got kicked out by FAU police.

    The Florida Legislature hit FAU with an unprecedented $30 million in budget cuts for the coming year. For some students the cuts will delay graduation by a semester or a year because a required course is not offered in the summer. They also say classes were slashed by administrators with no input from students or faculty.

    “It’s really depressing, it’s sad. I got my undergraduate from FAU and I decided to come back here. It is just a shock the university wouldn’t go through their own staff, let alone their students,” said Monique Paramore, FAU graduate student.

    Read more and view video report at cbs12.com

    No Comments

  • Apr
    11

    April 11, 2012. Chorus grows stronger over MJ Saunders’ high-handed style and forced austerity

    Responding to deep cuts in the summer course schedule at Florida Atlantic University, faculty and students are planning protests against what they call unfair and arbitrary reductions which will hurt students, faculty, and academic programs.

    In response they are planning protest rallies on the west steps of the administration building on the Boca Raton campus.  The first, organized by students, will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursday, April 12.

    The second, organized by the UFF-FAU and supported by students, will be held on Wednesday, April 18 at 12 noon.  In addition, everyone is invited to make protest signs in the lobby of the Culture and Society Building at 5 on Monday, April 16.

    Administrators have cut almost a thousand courses from 2011, about a third of the total.

    FAU was hit by the Florida Legislature last month with an unprecedented $30 million in budget cuts for the coming year.  In all, the eleven public universities have lost $730 million in state funding since 2008, and will lose another $300 million this year, half from appropriations and half from their own reserves.

    This last legislative move prompted Moody’s Investors Service to take the unusual step of publicly criticizing the Legislature for damaging the universities’ credit.  Meanwhile, the Legislature and Governor gave corporations another $80 million in tax breaks in addition to the billions they’ve received in recent years, while cutting hospitals and nursing homes in addition to universities.  State colleges have endured similar cutbacks.

    “It’s bad enough that the Legislature and Governor are undermining our state’s future by slashing higher education.  But the university is compounding the problem by using a top-down, one-size-fits-all approach to summer cuts,” said Chris Robe, president of the faculty union, the United Faculty of Florida – FAU.

    Robe points out that cuts have been imposed unilaterally from the provost’s office with virtually no regard for students’ needs or faculty advice in particular programs.  The cuts are also insensitive to the needs of FAU students, many of whom are non-traditional students who have jobs and families, and cannot afford to delay graduation for a semester or a year because a required course is not offered in the summer, and who are thus more likely to drop out.

    In her message to students and parents on the front page of FAU’s web site, President Mary Jane Saunders says that “the most important thing you need to know is that nothing has changed for you at FAU.  Students are still our first priority, and we remain committed to helping you progress steadily toward your degree.  As in the past, we will continue to offer all courses needed for graduation.” http://www.fau.edu/explore/homepage-stories/2012_03budgetcut.php.

    However, a March 21 memorandum from Provost Brenda Claiborne instructs deans and chairs to cut all courses from the summer 2012 schedule which during summer 2011 did not enroll at least 24 students in undergraduate courses or 11 students in graduate courses.  While the provost leaves room open for exceptions, some programs have been hurt very badly, others not at all.

    According to faculty and students in various departments, this edict ignores the need for small classes in lab and studio courses with prerequisites, many of which have simply been cancelled because they did not enroll 24 students last summer.  While some programs have accreditation requirements which protect their course sequences from arbitrary disruptions, some of these programs were cut anyway, while others were not.

    Students in Education, Business, Science, the Visual Arts and elsewhere have had their progress toward graduation interrupted and their lives put on hold.  In other departments, students and faculty have had their class sizes arbitrarily increased, with little regard for academic quality, to accommodate the smaller course offerings, and the problems promise to compound themselves in the fall and spring terms because of delays to student graduation.

    In a follow-up memorandum dated April 10, the provost appears finally to begin to listen to faculty and students and add some courses, but much unnecessary damage has already been done.  Many students have already opted to enroll elsewhere this summer, and faculty summer plans have been disrupted.  Faculty and student leaders remain determined to keep the pressure on until their voices are heard.

    Monique Paramore, a graduate student in Education who is organizing the protest to be held April 12, also created a petition to FAU administrators at http://www.signon.org/sign/students-in-opposition/.  In addition to attracting over 700 signers so far, the petition contains comments from students in numerous programs describing the negative consequences of cancelled courses.  Ms. Paramore describes her protest in these terms:  “I and several other students are concerned with the university’s decision to cut certain courses necessary to our graduation.  On Tuesday the 27th, I created a petition concerning this matter. I currently have 723 signatures and comments. I/we understand the need for certain cuts but I feel that when this decision was made the university failed to take into consideration the differences among departments, the different class schedules, and the specific needs of each program.

    I received my undergraduate degree from FAU and have continued to be a dedicated Owl. I am hurt and upset at the way the university has handled this matter. I created this petition to bring attention and awareness to this situation. Even after the petition gained several hundred signatures, the administration refused to answer our questions, listen to our suggestions or simply apologize. So I decided to continue my protest by leading my fellow students in a rally against the course cuts. All I/we want is the opportunity to get some questions answered and to figure out our options as it pertains to future class offerings and graduation. We simply want the chance to suggest other options and to have our voices as well as those of our department leaders heard!”

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